Philosophy and Ethics

Curriculum Mapping Document

Year

Term

Curriculum

Assessment

12

Autumn 1

Philosophy of Religion: Design Argument and criticisms Ontological argument and criticisms Cosmological Argument – 3rd Way and criticisms Ethics and Religion: Ethical theories – Natural law, Situation Ethics, Virtue Theory Application of theories to lying and theft Advantages and Disadvantages of each theory.

Specimen A Level exam paper on topics covered. Graded A-U

Autumn 2

Philosophy of Religion: Evil and Suffering Religious Experiences Ethics and Religion: Religious and non-religious understandings of the status and rights of the embryo; sanctity of life. Embryo research; cloning; 'designer' babies. Abortion. Voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide. Capital punishment. Issues of animal life and death. Religious and non-religious understandings of the status and rights of animals. Use of animals as food; intensive farming. Use of animals in scientific procedures; cloning. Blood Sports, Animals as source of organs for transplants

Specimen A Level exam paper on topics covered. Graded A-U

Spring 1

Christianity God - Monotheism and the Trinity. Anthropomorphic descriptions of God; God as ‘wholly other’. God as omnipotent, omniscient and benevolent. God as creator, sustainer and interventionist. God as immanent and transcendent.  God in process theology. Sources of Wisdom and Authority -  Differing sources of wisdom and authority in Christianity; their authority for Christians; how they are Applied Self, Death and the Afterlife –  The nature of the soul. Death. Spiritual and physical resurrection, judgement, heaven and hell.  Objective immortality in process theology. Beliefs about the meaning and purpose of life.

Mock exam on topics covered so far – Philosophy and Ethics Specimen A Level exam paper on topics covered. Graded A-U

Spring 2

Key Moral Principles –  God as the Good/morally perfect and the source of moral values Equality Justice. Honesty. The significance of these principles and their influence, with reference, as appropriate, to: racial equality; the equal value of the able bodied and disabled; allocation of medical resources, including: organs for transplants to those who have abused their bodies through drink, drugs or Obesity; theft; truth telling and lying. Christian religious identity –  The role of faith, works and ritual in making an individual a Christian. Diversity of denominational, traditional and liberal views about Christian identity. Differing expressions of Christian identity in lifestyle, worship, moral conduct. Differing understandings of the role of the Christian community in society.

Year 12 exam Specimen A Level exam paper on topics covered. Graded A-U

Summer 1

Christian religious identity –  The role of faith, works and ritual in making an individual a Christian. Diversity of denominational, traditional and liberal views about Christian identity. Differing expressions of Christian identity in lifestyle, worship, moral conduct. Differing understandings of the role of the Christian community in society.

 

Philosophy – Miracles –  Differing understandings of ‘miracle’ realist and anti realist views violation of natural law or natural event.

 

Ethics – Meta Ethics – The study of Divine Command Theory and its strengths and weakneses.

Naturalism: Utilitarianism – what is rights causes pleasure, what is wrong causes pain. Evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of this theory.

 

AQA AS exam – external – Philosophy and Ethics and Christianity

Summer 2

Philosophy: Comparison of the key ideas of David Hume and Maurice Wiles on miracles. The significance of these views for religion.

Explore a case study for Miracles – Annabel Beam and link different philosophical understandings of miracles to this case study.

 

Ethics: Continue with Meta-Ethics – study of Non-naturalism: intuitionism and evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of this theory.

 

 

 A Level practice AO1 and AO2 on topics covered. Graded A-U

13

Autumn 1

 

Philosophy – Religious Language The issue of whether religious language should be viewed cognitively or non-cognitively. The challenges of the verification and falsification principles to the meaningfulness of religious language.  Responses to these challenges:  eschatological verification with reference to Hick  language as an expression of a Blik with reference to R.M.Hare religious language as a language game with reference to Wittgenstein Other views of the nature of religious language: religious language as symbolic with reference to Tillich religious language as analogical with reference to Aquinas the Via Negativa.

 

Ethics – Bentham and Kant

Students study the key ideas of Bentham and Kant regarding moral decision making and compare.

Students then evaluate how far these 2 ethical theories are consistent with religious moral decision-making.

 

 

Practice A Level questions on topics covered – graded A-U

Autumn 2

Philosophy – Self, death and afterlife

The nature and existence of the soul and Descartes’ argument for the existence of the soul.

The body and soul relationship – including different physicalist and dualist beliefs

Different philosophical beliefs on the possibility of continuing personal existence after death including Bundle Theory, Hick’s replica theory, Price’s Dream world and reincarnation.

Near Death experiences and their value as potential evidence towards life after death

Process Theology’s objective immortality in comparison with traditional subjective immortality.

 

Ethics – Conscience Differing ideas, religious and non-religious, about the nature of conscience. The role of conscience in making moral decisions with reference to: telling lies and breaking promises adultery. The value of conscience as a moral guide.

 

Ethics - Free will and moral responsibility – Students study the conditions of moral responsibility: freewill; understanding the difference between right and wrong.

They explore different theories with regards to the extent of our moral responsibility such as Libertarianism, Hard Determinism and Compatibilism.

Students also explore the relevance of moral responsibility to reward and punishment.

 

Practice AO1 and AO2 questions based on topics taught. Graded A-U.

Spring 1

Christianity – Christianity and Science

How and why science has influenced Christianity and how Christianity has responded – with particular reference to evidence and reason in science.

God of the Gaps, responses to Darwin’s theory of evolution, contemporary responses to the Big Bang Theory and Creationist views.

John Polkinghorne’s views that Christianity and science are compatible.

Different Christian responses to issues raised by science in particular Genetic Engineering.

 

Christianity, gender and sexuality – Students study the historical and social factors that have influenced the developments in Christian thinking about gender and sexuality. This includes Biblical criticism and the changing roles of men and women in society and the rights given to women by secular governments.

Students also study feminist approaches and the debate surrounding female ordination and compare the views of Daphne Hampson and Rosemary Radford Ruether.

Different Christian views about celibacy, marriage, homosexuality and transgender issues are also explored.

 

Year 13 Mock exam on Philosophy and Ethics topics

Spring 2

Christianity – Christianity and the challenge of secularisation

Exploration of what the challenge of secularisation is – including the replacement of religion as the main source of truth and moral values.

The rise of militant atheism and the view that religion is irrational.

How Christianity has responded to these challenges – the response to materialistic secular values, McGrath’s response to Dawkins and the emergence of new forms of Christian expression e.g. House Church Movement and Fresh Expressions.

Emphasis on the social relevance of Christianity – liberation theology.

 

Christianity, migration and religious pluralism – Students study how migration has created multi-cultural societies and the diversity of faiths in Britain today and the influence of religious pluralism, freedom of religion on Christian thought.

Exploration of a range of Christian thought on this issue including; Exclusivism, Pluralism (John Hick) and Christian responses to issues of religious expression in society.

 

 

Dialogues – the Dialogue between Christianity and Philosophy and the Dialogue between Christianity and Ethics.

Synoptic part of the course revising and evaluating the key Christian, Philosophical and Ethics issues and how they impact on each other.

Practice A Level questions on topics taught graded A-U

 

Practice of Dialogues style questions so students familiar with this synoptic element of the course. Graded A-U.

Summer 1

Continue revision and Dialogues practice

 

Year 13 external A Level exam June.

Summer 2